Investigation and Assessment of the NECO’s Effectiveness against Cassava Bacterial Blight Caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Manihotis In Côte D’Ivoire

Investigation and Assessment of the NECO’s Effectiveness against Cassava Bacterial Blight Caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Manihotis In Côte D’Ivoire

History and objective: Successfully implemented agriculture helps to minimise hunger and malnutrition in Sub-Saharan African countries’ rapidly growing populations Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important crop in intertropical regions. It is, however, subject to several factors, including the bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. It’s Manihotis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of two varieties of cassava, including the traditional variety (Diarrassouba) and the improved variety (Bocou 1) in the bacterial blight endemic region of Ferkessédougou and, on the other hand, to measure the bactericidal activity of NECO, a biological product derived from essential oil extracted from Ocimum gratissimum.
Materials and Methods: Eight increased NECO concentrations were used to test in vitro antibacterial activity relative to the reference Callicuivre, and the 5 mL LG1 NECO dose was used in situ. With one-way ANOVA and Statistica tools, data was analysed.
Results: The results show that NECO has bacterial inhibitory activity ranging from 0.34-3.46 cm in diameter. In situ, depending on the crop season, the use of NECO at a 5 mL LG1 dose significantly decreases bacterial blight in the 74.94-59.35 percent range.
Conclusion: after three applications of this biological product (NECO), an increase was observed at a dosage of 5 mL LG1 for the rainy season (critical) with an average efficacy of 65 percent compared to 48.16 percent for Callicuivre, the reference product. In sustainable agriculture, the findings obtained are interesting for the future. Therefore, NECO may be used in cassava bacterial blight control as an alternative to synthetic products.

Author (s) Details

Affery Arthur Martin
Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Department of Biosciences, University Félix Houphouët-Boigny of Cocody-Abidjan, 22 B.P. 582, 22 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.

Abo Kouabenan
Laboratory of Plant Pathology and Plant Biology, Department of Training and Research in Agriculture and Animal Resources, Institute National Polytechnique Félix Houphouët-Boigny, B.P. 1313, Yamoussoukro, Côte d’Ivoire.

Wonni Issa
Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), BP 910, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

Tuo Seydou
Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Department of Biosciences, University Félix Houphouët-Boigny of Cocody-Abidjan, 22 B.P. 582, 22 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.

Kassi Fernand Martial
Univérsité Félix Houphouët-Boigny de Cocody-Abidjan, Unité de Formation et de Recherche (UFR) Biosciences, Laboratoire de Physiologie Végétale, B.P, 582 Abidjan 22, Côte d’Ivoire.

Camara Brahima
Univérsité Félix Houphouët-Boigny de Cocody-Abidjan, Unité de Formation et de Recherche (UFR) Biosciences, Laboratoire de Physiologie Végétale, B.P, 582 Abidjan 22, Côte d’Ivoire.

Koné Daouda
Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Department of Biosciences, University Félix Houphouët-Boigny of Cocody-Abidjan, 22 B.P. 582, 22 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.

View Book :- https://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/344

Editor 251News

Related Posts

leave a comment

Create Account



Log In Your Account