News Update on Banana Cultivars Research: Feb – 2020

News Update on Banana Cultivars Research: Feb – 2020

News Update on Banana Cultivars Research: Feb – 2020

Differences among Spanish and Latin-American banana cultivars: morphological, chemical and sensory characteristics

Physical (weight, size, shape, texture and colour), physicochemical (pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, moisture content, total solids), chemical (soluble sugars, vitamin C, starch, pectic substances, volatile compounds) and biochemical (polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activities, soluble proteins) characteristics and sensory attributes (appearance, flavour, odour, colour, firmness, acceptability) of banana (Musa cavendishii L.) fruits were studied so as to assess possible differences between nutritional properties and consumer acceptability of the local (Canarian) cultivars Enana and Gran Enana and therefore the Latin-American (Colombian) Enana cultivar. Significant differences (P ≤ 0•05) were found between size and length of fruit, and between other objective measurements (lightness, yellowness, acidity, moisture content, starch, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities, soluble sugars—sucrose, fructose, glucose). Also there have been significant differences in vitamin C and protein content which established the upper nutritional value of the Spanish banana cultivars. [1]

Genetic characterization of banana cultivars (Musa spp.) from Brazil using microsatellite markers

Microsatellite markers were wont to characterize 35 banana (Musa spp.)genotypes cultivated in Brazil, including triploid cultivars and tetraploid hybrids. a complete of 33 Musa-specific primers were tested, and 11 produced clear ,reproducible and discrete bands. the typical number of alleles amplified per primer was 6.1, starting from 4 to eight , with a complete of 67 alleles identified. Phenetic analysis supported Jaccard similarity index derived from presence or absence of the alleles agreed with the morphological classification. Bootstrap analysis divided the genotypes into four clusters, consistent with genomic group and subgroup classification. the primary cluster contained the bulk of cultivars which have ‘A’ genome alone; while the second contained all triploid cultivars of the subgroup Prata (Pome) and their tetraploid hybrids. The third cluster contained cultivar ‘Maçã’ along side other genotypes considered for breeding purposes as almost like the Silk subgroup. [2]

Composition of volatiles of banana cultivars from Madeira Island

The composition of the volatiles of banana fruit from various cultivars grown on Madeira Island has been determined. Using GC‐MS, the volatiles were shown to be complex mixtures of several classes of components, mainly esters, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and acids. the typical contents of the entire volatiles from cultivars “Dwarf Cavendish”, “Giant Cavendish”, “Robusta” and “Williams” were 93.0, 116.5, 157.3 and 157.0 mg/kg, respectively. The ester and alcoholic fractions appear to play a decisive role within the organoleptic characteristics of banana fruit, presenting a considerable content starting from 57.2 to 89.8 mg/kg and 19.0 to 47.7 mg/kg, respectively, altogether cultivars from Madeira Island studied. 3‐Methyl butyl butanoate ester was the main constituent. [3]

Expression and distribution of extensins and AGPs in susceptible and resistant banana cultivars in response to wounding and Fusarium oxysporum

Banana wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is soil-borne disease of banana (Musa spp.) causing significant economic losses. Extensins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are cell membrane components important for pathogen defence. Their significance for Foc resistance in banana wasn’t reported thus far . during this study, two banana cultivars differing in Foc sensitivity were wont to monitor the changes in transcript levels, abundance and distribution of extensins and AGPs after wounding and Foc inoculation. Extensins mainly appeared within the plant organ and meristematic cells. AGPs recognized by JIM13, JIM8, PN16.4B4 and CCRC-M134 antibodies located in root hairs, xylem and plant organ . Individual AGPs and extensins showed specific radial distribution in banana roots. [4]

Agronomic Performance of Different Banana Cultivars in the Capixaba North Region

There are many banana cultivars developed by genetic breeding programs in Brazil, however, when considering the related aspects, consumer market preference and therefore the effects of the genotype-by-environment interaction, the choices could also be restricted to a couple of regions of the country. Therefore, the target of this study was to guage the vegetative and productive development in three cycles of 12 banana genotypes under an irrigation system within the edaphoclimatic conditions of the northwestern region of the state of Espírito Santo, during a randomized block design with four replicates. During three cycles, the subsequent characteristics were evaluated: plant height, number of shoots, number of total and functional leaves, pseudostalk diameter at 5 and 30 cm from the bottom , bunch weight, number of fruits per bunch, number of bunch and size and fruit diameter. The results showed that the genotypes with the best productive potential were the ‘Grand Nine’ of the Cavendish group, followed by Thap Maeo Cavendish group. For the ‘Prata’ group, the simplest genotypes were the ‘Gali’, ‘Pacovan’ and ‘Fhia 18’. The ‘Princesa’ was the foremost productive within the ‘Maçã’ group, having a cultivation potential within the northern region of Espírito Santo. [5]

Reference

[1] Cano, M.P., de Ancos, B., Matallana, M.C., Cámara, M., Reglero, G. and Tabera, J., 1997. Differences among Spanish and Latin-American banana cultivars: morphological, chemical and sensory characteristics. Food Chemistry, 59(3), (Web Link)

[2] Creste, S., Neto, A.T., de Oliveira Silva, S. and Figueira, A., 2003. Genetic characterization of banana cultivars (Musa spp.) from Brazil using microsatellite markers. Euphytica, 132(3), (Web Link)

[3] Nogueira, J.M.F., Fernandes, P.J.P. and Nascimento, A.M.D., 2003. Composition of volatiles of banana cultivars from Madeira Island. Phytochemical Analysis: An International Journal of Plant Chemical and Biochemical Techniques, 14(2), (Web Link)

[4] Expression and distribution of extensins and AGPs in susceptible and resistant banana cultivars in response to wounding and Fusarium oxysporum
Yunli Wu, Wei Fan, Xiaoquan Li, Houbin Chen, Tomáš Takáč, Olga Šamajová, Musana Rwalinda Fabrice, Ling Xie, Juan Ma, Jozef Šamaj & Chunxiang Xu
Scientific Reports volume 7, (Web Link)

[5] Gabriel Berilli, A. P., Viganô, M., de Sales, R., Berilli, S., Furno Fontes, P., Fontes, A., Quartezani, W., Cunha Junior, J. de, de Souza, C. M., de Oliveira, E. and Varnier, E. (2018) “Agronomic Performance of Different Banana Cultivars in the Capixaba North Region”, Journal of Experimental Agriculture International, 22(2), (Web Link)

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