Studies on Clinical and Ultrasonographic Examinations in Cattle with Empty Rectum

Studies on Clinical and Ultrasonographic Examinations in Cattle with Empty Rectum

Aim: Due to the absence of faeces and or empty rectum, the analysis was carried out to elicit GI disturbances in cattle. Design of the Research: In clinical cases, the study was performed. Study location and duration: Veterinary Clinical Complex, Veterinary College and Institute of Research, Orathanadu-614 625, India. During the year 2015-16, the analysis was carried out. Methodology: For this study, animals with a steady decrease in dung and mucoid or scant and absence of faeces were chosen. All the animals selected underwent clinical and thoraco-abdominal ultrasound exams. Results: In total, twenty nine cattle with different GI disorders were found to be affected. The frequency of GI disturbances in cross-bred Jersey cows was greater (65.52 percent). Absence of faeces (65.52 percent), anorexia (58.62 percent), scant/tarry/mucous covered foul odour faeces (34.48 percent), arched back (24.14 percent) and abdominal distention were the popular clinical indications (24.14 percent ). Both 29 animals selected were subjected to thoraco-abdominal ultrasonography showing peritonitis (31.03 percent), paralytic ileus with peritonitis and pericarditis (10.34 percent each), uroabdomen, intussusception, caecal dilatation, abomasal dilatation and peritonitis with intussusception (6.90 percent each), diaphragmatic hernia, reticular abscess, omasal impaction and peritonitis. Clinical and ultrasonographic tests, based on this research, were found to be a useful method for the diagnosis of GI disorders in empty rectum cattle. Conclusion: Thoraco-abdominal ultrasonography has been shown to be a valuable diagnostic imaging technique to identify empty rectal lesions in cattle. Thoracic and abdominal ultrasound play an important role in the diagnosis of thoracic-abdominal disorders in cattle in large-scale animal practise.

Author(s) Details

Dr. M. Saravanan
Veterinary Clinical Complex, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Orathanadu-614 625, TANUVAS, India.

Dr. M. Ranjithkumar
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Madras Veterinary College, Chennai-600 007, TANUVAS, India.

Dr. S. Yogeshpriya
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Orathanadu-614 625, TANUVAS, India.

Dr. R. Ravi
Department Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Namakkal-637 002, TANUVAS, India.

Dr. K. Kannan
Veterinary Clinical Complex, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Orathanadu-614 625, TANUVAS, India.

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