Critical Scientific Realism

This book involves the rescue of scientific realism, showing that reports of its death are greatly exaggerated. Philosophical realism holds that the aim of a specific discourse is to form true statements about its material . Ilkka Niiniluoto surveys different sorts of realism in various areas of philosophy then sets out his own critical realist philosophy of science. [1]

Realism in Mathematics

Mathematicians tend to consider themselves as scientists investigating the features of real mathematical things, and therefore the wildly successful application of mathematics within the physical sciences reinforces this picture of mathematics as an objective study. For philosophers, however, this realism about mathematics raises serious questions: What are mathematical things? Where are they? How can we realize them? Offering a scrupulously fair treatment of both mathematical and philosophical concerns, Penelope Maddy here delineates and defends a completely unique version of mathematical realism. She answers the normal questions and poses a challenging new one, refocusing philosophical attention on the pressing foundational problems with contemporary mathematics. [2]

Critical Realism: An Introduction to Roy Bhaskar’s Philosophy

This book expounds the transcendental realist theory of science and important naturalist social philosophy that are developed by Bhaskar and are employed by many contemporary social scientists. It defends Bhaskar’s view that the likelihood and necessity of experiment show that reality is structured and stratified, his use of this concept to develop a non-reductive explanatory account of human sciences, and his notion that to elucidate social structures can sometimes be to criticize them. After a discussion of the uses of critical realism in controversial areas of science , Bhaskar’s optimism about the prospects of human sciences is criticized. [3]

Differential effects of face-realism and emotion on event-related brain potentials and their implications for the uncanny valley theory

Cartoon characters are omnipresent in popular media. While few studies have scientifically investigated their processing, in special effects , efforts are made to extend realism. Yet, close approximations of reality are suggested to evoke sometimes a sense of eeriness, the “uncanny valley” effect. Here, we used high-density electroencephalography to research brain responses to professionally stylized happy, angry, and neutral character faces. We employed six face-stylization levels varying from abstract to realistic and investigated the N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and late positive potential (LPP) event-related components. [4]

No More Live Lectures – Quixotism or Realism-? Association between Learning Preferences and Attendances at Live Lectures

Background: The increasing decline in medical students’ attendances at live lectures left educators with differing views on its acceptability.

Aim: The aim of this study was to seem at the association between the medical students’ attendances at live lectures and their learning preferences and outcomes.

Study Design: University based, cross sectional study.

Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at International Medical University, Malaysia from April to July 2015. [5]

Reference

[1] Niiniluoto, I., 1999. Critical scientific realism. (Web Link)

[2] Maddy, P., 1990. Realism in mathematics. (Web Link)

[3] Collier, A., 1994. Critical realism: an introduction to Roy Bhaskar’s philosophy. (Web Link)

[4] Differential effects of face-realism and emotion on event-related brain potentials and their implications for the uncanny valley theory
Sebastian Schindler, Eduard Zell, Mario Botsch & Johanna Kissler
Scientific Reports volume 7, (Web Link)

[5] Liew, S.-C., Sidhu, J. and Barua, A. (2017) “No More Live Lectures – Quixotism or Realism-? Association between Learning Preferences and Attendances at Live Lectures”, Journal of Advances in Medicine and Medical Research, 20(12), (Web Link)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *