Determination of Students’ Transition from Face-to-Face Learning to Online Learning at Higher Education: A Case Study in Trinidad and Tobago

This action research focuses on the transition of undergraduate students from face-to-face learning to online learning at a Trinidad and Tobago higher education institution. According to a survey of the current literature in the local context, there is a scarcity of information about these students’ experiences. As a result, one of the main goals of this paper is to contribute to the lack of knowledge and to spotlight the voices of these kids. It is critical that policymakers pay more attention to and understand the perspectives of these students, particularly when developing policies related to online learning. As a result, a case study was done to learn more about the students’ transition experiences. This study included fifteen undergraduates. We used semi-structured surveys and informal structured interviews. The data was evaluated under three primary thematic headings: online learning (ONL) is a feasible instructional choice, face to face learning (F2F) is required for Mathematics, and face to face learning (F2F) is required for human connection. On the utilisation of greater ONL education, suggestions were made.

Author (S) Details

Rhonda Dookwah
Cipriani College of Labour and Cooperative Studies, Trinidad and Tobago.
Gabriel Julien
Programme Delivery Department, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Open Campus, Trinidad and Tobago.

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Study on Teaching with LEEMUSICA/READMUSIC in Higher Education: Perception and Improve in Music Education

The purpose of this study is to reflect students’ perceptions of their music education during their university teacher training and to assess their level of satisfaction with the Leemsica/Readmusic technique. Two examinations were conducted in the classroom with university students in the 3rd and 4th years of the Teacher’s Grade at the University of Valladolid’s Faculty of Education. They took place at the start of the first semester of the academic year 2017/18 and at the end of the first semester. The first is about their previous musical education (school and high school, as well as formal/informal music education—conservatories and music schools – and their perceptions of basic music skills acquisition). The second test inquires about their perceptions of improvement in those skills (music language, tuning, playing instruments, auditory education, music didactics, and ICT use) following their training in Higher Education using the Leemsica/Readmusic methodology.

Author (S) Details

Rosario Castanon-Rodríguez
Department of Didactic of Music, Faculty of Education, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belen, 1, 47011 Valladolid, Spain.
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Transmission of Cultural Heritage and Identity through Traditional Music and Storytelling with a Focus on Bapedi Children’s Musical Arts

The oral acts of the Bapedi people are diverse and extensive, and they are passed down from generation to generation as a living tradition. The backdrop of festival music making in Bapedi community is a natural manner of mixing enjoyment and education. Children learn via discovery rather than being overwhelmed with hard facts in early childhood music education, which is a multidimensional subject integrating numerous strands of knowledge. The goal of this anthropological study was to see how traditional music and storytelling may be used to convey cultural legacy and identity among the Bapedi people, with a special focus on children’s musical arts. Informal interviews, observations, and recordings were the primary data sources. Publications and records are examples of secondary sources. This study was inspired by two interrelated research questions: 1) How do children in the Bapedi society learn their culture through traditional music and storytelling? 2) What moral lessons can be learned from traditional Bapedi music and storytelling? The findings revealed that play underpins practically all informal learning in early life. The findings also revealed that some songs are allegedly sung by certain characters in a storey and are taught by parents during storytelling evenings.

Author (S) Details

Morakeng Edward Kenneth Lebaka
Department of Creative Arts, Faculty of Arts, University of Zululand, Kwa Dlangezwa Campus, South Africa.
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A Proposal for a Teacher Training Curriculum on School Violence and Violence in Schools

In the first part of this study, the question of school violence is examined, whether it is violence that occurs at school as a result of external pressures (cultural, social, and familiar) or violence that occurs within the school’s organisational structures (institutional violence), and is then reflected in all those involved in the school. When it comes to explaining violence, it can be explained by individual, psychological, and behavioural characteristics, as well as familiar and social elements, and the interaction of each of these aspects. Nonetheless, because school violence is unlikely to go away anytime soon, it is critical that teachers-in-training be prepared in advance to deal with various levels of violence. To this end, a specific subject titled Violence in School: Educating to Intervene, Intervening to Prevent was created for teachers-in-training of Infant and Primary School. In the second half of the article, three instructors from the University of Aveiro’s Educational Department (Portugal) describe how, as part of the European Project NOVAS RES, they developed a curriculum for reducing school violence. We hope that our curriculum will inspire other institutions to provide future teachers-in-training with the resources they will need to deal with violence.

Author (S) Details

Ana Pedro
Departamentode Educação, Universidadede Aveiro, Aveiro, 3810-193, Portugal.

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Study of the Implementation of Integrated Science Curriculum at Grade 8 in Bangladesh: An Approach towards Challenges and Way Forward

This paper looks at the challenges science teachers experience when implementing the integrated Science Curriculum 2012 in Grade 8 and suggests a solution for overcoming them. A mixed-methods technique was used to perform the study. Bangladeshi Grade 8 Science teachers took part in this research. A variety of survey questionnaires and an interview schedule were used to obtain data. With Grade 8 science teachers, science curriculum professionals assessed and pre-tested data collection procedures. Descriptive statistics were used to interpret the survey results. To understand the findings, both qualitative and quantitative data were triangulated. Grade 8 Science instructors reported concerns such as unfriendly texts, insufficient physical and instructional facilities, a lack of teachers’ professional abilities, inconsistent in-service training, ineffective instructional monitoring, and a mentorship system. Regular professional development activities, the modernization of instructional facilities, the improvement of the physical environment, the updating of the Grade 8 Science textbook, and the development of a continuous instructional monitoring and mentoring system were all suggested as ways to move forward.

Author (S) Details

Mohammed Zakir Hossain
Institute of Education and Research, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.

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Public Policy for Regulating the Interaction between Labor Market Supply and Higher Education Demand in Israel: A Case Study

In recent decades, the global labour market in general, and the Israeli labour market in particular, have seen significant changes, affecting the availability of jobs in many occupations. The study’s objectives are as follows: To begin, determine the relationship between trends in labour supply and trends in higher education demand. Second, to figure out which way this encounter is going. Third, to look into Israeli public policy that may have an impact on one or both of these developments. and Finally, to give recommendations to policymakers regarding necessary changes in the nature of policy governing higher education regulation and adaptation to the demands of a dynamic labour market. There appears to be a link between changes in the labour market’s supply of jobs and adjustments in demand for higher education. A bidirectional link between the job market and the higher education system may be shown in two case studies in the Israeli economy. In one scenario, it was discovered that when the number of jobs in the field of computers and engineering grows, so does the need for academic education in this subject. In the second scenario, increased demand for legal academic education resulted in a flooded labour market, which had negative consequences for the sector. The public policy established in Israel to regulate the labour market and higher education system is short-term in nature, and it consists of retrospectively examining actual circumstances and attempting to improve them by directing students to various disciplines in order to meet the labour market’s needs or correct its failures. It does not, however, explore future trends or attempt to discover future needs or flaws that may be predicted now.

Author (S) Details

Erez Cohen
Department of Middle Eastern Studies – Political Science, Ariel University, Israel.
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Trips and Readings from the Split House: Melville, Stone, Moby Dick, and Platoon

In this essay, Oliver Stone’s film Platoon is compared to Herman Melville’s classic Moby Dick as stories in which two protagonists, Chris and Ishmael, leave their homeland on a perilous voyage. Ishmael joins the whaling Pequod, seeking whales in the world’s oceans, while Chris goes to combat in the Vietnam woods. The conflicts of their split homeland, the United States of America, are present in both storylines. Platoon depicts the daily battle of a small unit in a military film where fighting sequences are central. Multi-ethnic troops conducting search and destroy operations reflect socioeconomic tensions in the US. Platoon is on the lookout for a tenacious and defiant foe of American science and military might. The novel Moby Dick is a metaphorical depiction of a divided America and Captain Ahab, who is obsessed with avenging himself on the White Whale. Platoon and Pequod are destroyed by American policy in Vietnam, much like Moby Dick. Using Michel Onfray as a guide, we view both stories as journeys that begin in a library and whose heroes imitate the Greek Achilles’ gesture of fleeing a comfortable home life for the dangers of the world on their way to immortality. Whether in Pequod or Platoon, our heroes take the risk of eventually maturing with the help of a metaphorical family of brothers. Ahab and Barnes, their symbolic parents, are castrating, tyrannical, and oppressive. The heroes’ complete independence occurs when they meet and eliminate their symbolic parents, bringing an end to their round trip back to the home from which they had set out.

Author (S) Details

Jose Mauricio Saldanha-Alvarez
Cultural Studies and Media Department, Federal Fluminense University, Brazil.
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Study about Cultural Implications for Learners’ Effectiveness as Governors of Schools in Rural South Africa

The South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996, establishes School Governing Bodies, which allows stakeholders such as parents, educators, and students to actively engage in school governance decision-making processes. The Act further states that learners should be given a full opportunity to participate in important decisions made by the governing body through the Representative Council of Learners. The motivation for conducting this research was sparked by many writers’ concerns regarding the high level of ineffectiveness of learners as school governors in South Africa. The goal of this study was to look into the role of culture in determining the efficacy of learners as school governors in rural South Africa. The perspectives of members of Representative Councils of Learners (RCL) from selected rural high schools in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, were solicited in order to achieve this goal. The focus of these perceptions was on the extent to which cultural issues hampered learner effectiveness as school governors. The importance of culture in connection to learners’ efficiency as school governors in rural South Africa was investigated and analysed in this study. Members of the Representative Council of Learners in various high schools in the Harry Gwala District in KwaZulu-Natal were engaged in a qualitative research technique based on a purposive sampling procedure and interviews. Culture was one of the key hurdles to learners’ effective school governance in the rural South African environment, according to the findings of the empirical study investigation. The study suggests that the Department of Education intervene in order to create an atmosphere that encourages active learner engagement in school governance in rural locations.

Author (S) Details

Vangeli Wiseman Gamede
Discipline of Management and Entrepreneurship, School of Management, IT and Governance, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa..

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Civic Competences Aspect in the Educational Process of Pupils from Socio-economically Disadvantaged Backgrounds

Every one of us will experience an emergency at some point in our lives, whether it’s a fire, an accident, a traffic collision, or a natural disaster, and it’s critical that we know how to recognise them and respond appropriately. The major goal of the study is to measure the level of protection and safety awareness among primary school students in socioeconomically marginalised areas, ranging from first to third grade. The text describes the level of protection and safety awareness among Czech primary school students in the first to third grades who live in socioeconomically marginalised areas. Children’s and students’ education in areas of pollution prevention is becoming a hot topic. The problem is to alert and urge teachers to continue with topics that develop not only knowledge but also perceptions of the outside world and awareness of hazards and dangers that could damage a child’s or pupil’s development.

Author (S) Details

Lukas Starek
Department of Special Education, Univerzita Jana Amose Komenskeho Praha S.R.O., Rohacova 63 Prague 3, 130 00, Czech Republic.

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A Study on Applications of Systems Engineering to Holistic Didactics

There are a variety of techniques that math and statistics teachers have used to make statistics more engaging and hence improve student success. One of these strategies is to connect the app to something intriguing. However, going back into the history of why these techniques were invented in the first place is an often ignored method of making statistics more fascinating. This rich history can often provide pupils with a more logical orientation, which can help them learn more and be more engaged in the classroom. The goal of this project was to investigate strategies to improve statistics education in the classroom by bringing statistics history into the curriculum. This study looks at some of the historical aspects of statistics and explains how adding this material in a learning plan might assist students learn the topic.

Author (S) Details

Evangelos C. Papakitsos
Research Laboratory of “Data, Information and Knowledge Management”, University of West Attica, Greece.
Panagiotis S. Makrygiannis
Research Laboratory of “Electronic Automation, Telematics and Cyber-Physical Systems”, University of West Attica, Greece.
Anastasios Mavrakis
Research Laboratory of “Geo-Environmental Science and Environmental Quality Assurance”, University of West Attica, Greece.

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