Distribution of Proteoforms Numbers in a Human Cell according to Their Abundance is Following Zipf’s Law

Distribution of Proteoforms Numbers in a Human Cell according to Their Abundance is Following Zipf’s Law

The complex functional mechanisms of the cellular proteome are provided by the collaboration of thousands of protein components, protein species/proteoforms. Although recent methods do not yet enable us to obtain a complete picture of this collaboration, they do allow us to create a description of the proteome size and quantitative distribution of proteoforms within the proteome. We investigated the quantitative distribution of different proteoforms in human cells using 2DE analysis, accompanied by protein staining and ESI LC-MS/MS analysis. We looked at many human cancer cell lines (HepG2, glioblastoma, MCF7) as well as primary liver cells from tissue samples and discovered that Zipf’s law describes the relationship between the number of proteoforms and their abundance:
y = ax-1                                                                                                                                                     (1),

where y stands for the number of proteoforms (N), x stands for the abundance. In the case where the abundance is expressed as %V, and a = 14, the final equation is:

N=14/%V                                                                                                                                                              (2).
It is highly likely that this type of distribution reflects the fundamental functional organization of the human cellular proteome since it is the same in all types of cells analyzed.

Author(s) Details

Stanislav Naryzhny
Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Pogodinskaya 10, Moscow, 119121, Russia and B. P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Orlova Roscha, Gatchina, Leningrad Region, 188300, Russia.

Maria Maynskova
Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Pogodinskaya 10, Moscow, 119121, Russia.

Victor Zgoda
Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Pogodinskaya 10, Moscow, 119121, Russia.

Аlexander Archakov
Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Pogodinskaya 10, Moscow, 119121, Russia.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/CACB-V3/issue/view/57

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