Monitoring the Effect of Storage Time and Temperature on Serum Clinical Biochemistry Analytes

Objective: To determine the effect of storage time and temperature on laboratory outcomes of routine clinical biochemistry analytes in sera from seemingly healthy volunteers was the objective of the present research.

Materials and Methods: Ten healthy volunteers were advised to fast overnight and 10 ml of blood was extracted without anticoagulants from each subject (in red capped vacutainer). Samples were allowed to coagulate for 20 min at room temperature, centrifuged and separated by serum stored in various aliquots. The baseline analysis (‘0’ day values) of 18 serum analytes of each subject was carried out on the same day of collection without delay. In order to prevent direct light exposure, other aliquots were kept at 0°C and 4±1°C with an aluminium foil cover and examined for 3, 7, 15 and 30 days.

Results: Urea, uric acid, phosphorus, TG and HDL were stable for up to 7 days, while ALP was stable for up to 15 days, but SGOT was stable for up to 30 days at 0° C and 4±1° C. ALP, amylase and urea at a temperature of 0 °C were stable for up to 30 days. On the 3rd day, all analytes showed major variations that were stored at room temperature except for stable calcium. But for these analytes, glucose, creatinine, inorganic phosphorus and potassium were the least stable and should be determined at 4 ± 1 ° C within 48 hours and at 23 ± 1 ° C within 24 hours.

Conclusion: Different routine biochemical analytes were stable in the normal refrigerator under the storage conditions tested in this study for a minimum of up to 7 days. In special cases, this proof should be used because the preparation of any analyte for greater reproducibility can be performed on the same day. We suggest that samples should be analyzed in the laboratory within 24 hours of collection, preferably, to ensure that accurate findings can be shortened with the turn-around period from sample drawing to reporting the analytical result.

Author (s) Details

Manju Bala Pahwa
Department of Biochemistry, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak- 124001, India.

K. Menaka
Department of Biochemistry, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak- 124001, India.

Raj Manish
Department of Biochemistry, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak- 124001, India.

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