The density of mammograms is a powerful predictor of breast cancer. Menopause has a substantial impact on breast pattern and has been shown to have a greater impact on mammographic density reduction than age. The goal of this study was to investigate breast parenchymal density patterns in postmenopausal women in Ibadan and connect them with socio-demographic and anthropometric data. Methodology: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 196 postmenopausal women who underwent two screening views on each breast at the University College Hospital Ibadan’s Radiology Department. Data was taken from a questionnaire filled out by patients who had a mammogram during the time period under consideration. The mammography reports were matched with the patients’ sociodemographic information and analysed using the R statistical software. The women’s mean age at menopause was 48.44.6 years, and their mean age at menopause was 55.06.8 years. 82.1 percent of the women had the combined BI-RADS 1 and 2 breast parenchymal patterns, which are linked to a lower risk of breast cancer. The difference in average age at first birth between women with BI-RADS 1 and 2 and women with BI-RADS 3 and 4 was statistically significant (P=0.035). Although not statistically significant, BMI, family and personal history of breast cancer all exhibited a link with breast parenchymal pattern. Conclusion: The study’s findings of a low prevalence of dense breast pattern are consistent with earlier findings of a reduced prevalence of breast cancer in African women. The clustering of low mean age at first childbirth, low mean age at menopause, and multi-parity in the majority of the women in this study, in combination with low mammographic density, further supports the significantly lower risk of breast cancer in our study population.

Author (s) Details

O. S. Bassey
Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria and Department of Radiology, Nile University of Nigeria, Abuja.

T. O. Soyemi
Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

A. T. Adeniji-Sofoluwe
Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

A. O. Adeoye
Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

O. A. Mosuro
Department of Family Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

T. S. Akingbola
Department of Hematology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

O. O. Osofundiya
Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

G. O. Obajimi
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

A. O. Oluwasola
Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

M. O. Obajimi
Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

O. I. Olopade
Department of Medicine, Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics and Global Health, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/IDHR-V1/article/view/2152

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