Does the Web of Seismic Walls Play a Role to Their Out-of-Plane Stability?

Does the Web of Seismic Walls Play a Role to Their Out-of-Plane Stability?

Lately, international concern has been raised about the seismic behavior of structural walls, in particular with regard to their lateral instability under severe seismic loading. With the correct choice of an acceptable thickness, the probability of failure due to lateral instability is substantially reduced. It is commonly recognized that for walls with a rectangular section, EC8 and the Greek Concrete Code require 1/20 of the floor height as a minimum shear wall thickness. Seismic codes, internationally accepted and approved, such as the New Zealand and the American seismic code, have switched to more conservative choices about the minimum shear wall thickness (first 1/10 of storey height and second 1/16). The key cause which produces this lateral instability is flexural overstrain. In exchange, flexural overstrain is permitted due to the constant increase in the overall permissible tensile strain of steel bars. This deep excursion of the boundary components of shear walls in the yield area significantly increases their versatility. At the same time, due to seismic activity, these walls are liable to reverse axial loading (tension-compression), so their lateral stability is at stake. The latest work dealing with these aspects is experimental and explores the effect of the shear wall web on lateral instability to avoid (or not).

Author (s) Details

Theodoros Chrysanidis
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Ioannis Tegos
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Thessaloniki, Greece.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/AAER-V2/issue/view/31

Editor 251News

leave a comment

Create Account



Log In Your Account