With the advent of the “Internet of Things,” the demand for detection of network attacks has skyrocketed (or IoT). Users have grown accustomed to Internet of Things (IoT) devices. Because of the increased device growth, security measures have been prioritized in the development cycle of IoT devices. The primary goal of incorporating security into IoT deployments is to provide a more secure domain or environment for seamless activities and data privacy in the face of malicious attacks. The physical interfaces of network devices are the most vulnerable to vulnerabilities. assessing and analyzing attacks in terms of volume and severity, and developing counter-capabilities in a step-by-step fashion function with limited computing resources, so preventing DDoS attacks becomes difficult in such scenarios. Malware, phishing, man-in-the-middle attack, DDoS attack, SQL injection, and zero-day exploit are the most common cyber-attacks. DDoS attacks are classified into three types: volume-based attacks, protocol attacks, and application layer attacks, and are commonly used to degrade the performance of servers or networks. The experimental results demonstrate intrusion detection and prevention methods in a wired environment. This work is intended to detect and prevent DDoS attacks within a network in which one device serves as a server. the other as a target, and with one host acting as a botnet and the other attempting to protect the victim from attack. The botnet architecture is determined by replaying packet captures with tcpreplay. Snort, Wireshark, and various other attack implementation tools such as Kali Linux, Slowloris, Golden Eye, and others were used. The network attack can be either internal or external. As a result, the linked component becomes the victim. In wired mode, connections are made through a centralized hub, allowing for faster detections. Wi-Fi is used in wireless deployment to create a device LAN. Our approach examines threats, vulnerabilities, attacks, and intrusion detection and prevention.

Author (S) Details

T. J. Jeyaprabha
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Dr. G. Sumathi
Department of Information Technology, Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

S. Ahila
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

S. Deepika
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

P. Jaya Varshin
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

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