Monitoring the Inorganic and Organic Acids in the Atmosphere of the Urban Area of the City of Salvador, Brazil

Monitoring the Inorganic and Organic Acids in the Atmosphere of the Urban Area of the City of Salvador, Brazil

Air pollution is commonly recognised as the world’s leading cause of environmental degradation. The release of gases and pollutants into the environment causes significant air pollution issues, and the primary sources are automobiles and manufacturing activities. In Brazil, a number of fuels are used, and little is known about the presence of organic and inorganic acids in the atmosphere of Brazilian cities. In five Salvador areas, HNO3, HCl, HCOOH, and CH3COOH were sampled in the gas phase using passive samplers and thermodiffusion devices, with the H2SO4 particulate sampled as well. The organic and inorganic acids assessed contributed 89 percent and 11 percent, respectively, to the acidity of the city’s atmosphere, according to ion chromatography analyses. The strong associations between HCOOH, CH3COOH, and HCl with CO and NO2 suggested that these compounds came from a common source, mainly vehicular emissions. H2SO4 had strong correlations with PM10 and its predecessor SO2, while HNO3 had strong correlations with NO2 and NO precursors. The bulk of the compounds had negative associations with meteorological variables. These results were confirmed by PCA and HCA. The [HCOOH]/[CH3COOH] ratios ranged from 0.69 to 1.9, which is typical of metropolitan areas. All of the acids found in this study were affected by vehicle emissions, according to Pearson’s correlation review. Via PCA and HCA, important correlations were discovered between the studied acids, meteorological parameters, and criteria air pollutants in the atmosphere of this region.

Author (s) Details

Lícia P. S. Cruz
Federal University of Bahia, Chemistry Institute, Analytical Chemistry Department, Salvador 40170-115, Brazil.

Elisvan R. Mota
Federal University of Bahia, Chemistry Institute, Analytical Chemistry Department, Salvador 40170-115, Brazil.

Vânia P. Campos
Federal University of Bahia, Chemistry Institute, Analytical Chemistry Department, Salvador 40170-115, Brazil.

Franciele O. Santana
Federal University of Bahia, Chemistry Institute, Analytical Chemistry Department, Salvador 40170-115, Brazil.

Sâmeque R. Luz
Federal University of Bahia, Chemistry Institute, Analytical Chemistry Department, Salvador 40170-115, Brazil.

Daniela F. Santos
Federal University of Bahia, Chemistry Institute, Analytical Chemistry Department, Salvador 40170-115, Brazil.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/IREGES-V8/issue/view/37

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