Newsletter on Biochar Research: September-2018

Biochar could clear the air in more ways than one

Biochar may cut back native pollution from agriculture by reducing emissions of gas from the soil. Researchers argue that a far better understanding of gas response to biochar can save lives and cash, particularly on farms close to urban areas wherever agricultural emissions contribute to gas and particulate formation. [1]

Effects of Straw and Biochar Addition on Soil Carbon Balance and Ecological Benefits in a Rape-maize Rotation Planting System

The effects of various straw and biochar applications on the carbon balance of a farmland system were studied below a rape-maize rotation planting system. The study explored the impact of straw and biochar addition on soil carbon sequestration. A field experiment was administrated at the National Monitor Station of Soil Fertility and chemical potency of Purple Soils (Chongqing, China). 5 treatments, i.e., management (CK, no organic material), straw solely (CS), straw and organism (CSD), [*fr1] straw and [*fr1] biochar (CSBC), and biochar solely (BC) were applied. unchanged accumulative emissions of soil total carbon were after monitored. supported field experiment and survey knowledge, carbon emissions, carbon sequestration, and economic and environmental edges were analyzed for soil respiration, soil carbon pool, crop carbon pool, also because of the price of agricultural inputs when straw and biochar application. [2]

Characterisation and Thermochemical Conversion of Rice Husk for Biochar Production

We gift a thermochemical conversion of 4 forms of rice husk samples i.e. Laila (ARH), Pusu (BRH), Bandul Seminyak (CRH) and Sandakan (DRH), collected from Brunei Darussalam. an intensive proximate and elemental analysis of the obtained samples is conducted. additionally, we tend to completely investigate temperature parameter as a perform of weight loss for all samples via thermohydrometric analysis throughout several transmutation and combustion.  The study illustrated that 3 thermal decomposition stages occur throughout each transmutation and combustion. organic compound converts to volatiles within the second and third thermal decomposition stages. For the second and third stages of each transmutation and combustion, inhibitive and increasing interactions, with temperatures locomote between 250 °C to four hundred °C, and 430 °C to 900 °C within the former, severally. [3]

Comparison of rice hull biochar and cedar bark as growing media on the yield and postharvest quality of ‘Sachinoka’ strawberry

Strawberry is considered an extremely putrefiable fruit because of its extreme tenderness and high respiration rate. Amongst all, Japanese ‘Sachinoka’ strawberry is very favored in Japan for its sweetness and redness complexion, however, it’s relatively low firmness resulting in sensitive postharvest quality. Preharvest factors will minimize postharvest quality deterioration, however growing medium has not gained abundant attention as a crucial issue. Therefore, this study was conducted to check the result of 2 growing media on the postharvest quality preservation of the strawberry. Plants were big in cedar bark (BM) and rice hull biochar media (HM) and organized in a fully randomized block style within the greenhouse. [4]

Banana Peduncle Biochar: Characteristics and Adsorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution

Aims: Biochar created from completely different waste biomass has been documented as AN adsorbent for significant metal removal from contaminated water. In gift study, Banana peduncle that thought of as waste, however profusely on the market and have high biomass was elite for production of biochar to research its surface assimilation capability for hexavalent atomic number 24.

Place and length of Study: surroundings and property Department, CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology (CSIR-IMMT), Bhubaneswar, India, between Gregorian calendar month 2014 and Gregorian calendar month 2014. [5]

Reference

[1] Biochar could clear the air in more ways than one

Date: July 27, 2017, Source: Rice University (web link)

[2] Effects of Straw and Biochar Addition on Soil Carbon Balance and Ecological Benefits in a Rape-maize Rotation Planting System

Li J, Tian D, Huang R, Xu GX, Li JC, Gao M, Wang ZF. Effects of Straw and Biochar Addition on Soil Carbon Balance and Ecological Benefits in a Rape-maize Rotation Planting System. Huan Jing Ke xue= Huanjing kexue. 2018 Sep 8;39(9):4338. (web link)

[3] Characterisation and Thermochemical Conversion of Rice Husk for Biochar Production

AL HINAI MU. Characterisation and Thermochemical Conversion of Rice Husk for Biochar Production. International Journal of Renewable Energy Research (IJRER). 2018 Sep 8;8(3):1648-56. (web link)

[4] Comparison of rice hull biochar and cedar bark as growing media on the yield and postharvest quality of ‘Sachinoka’ strawberry

Rajapakse RP, Tanaka M. Comparison of rice hull biochar and cedar bark as growing media on the yield and postharvest quality of’Sachinoka’strawberry. InIV Asia Symposium on Quality Management in Postharvest Systems 1210 2017 Sep 12 (pp. 273-280). (web link)

[5] Banana Peduncle Biochar: Characteristics and Adsorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution

Adnan Asad Karim1*, Manish Kumar1, Sanghamitra Mohapatra1, C. R. Panda1, and Ankit Singh2

1Department of Environment and Sustainability, CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar-751013, India.

2School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. (web link)