Without a high somatic cell count (SCC) or pathogens causing mastitis in dairy cows and consumer diseases, quality of produced milk must take precedence above quantity in the dairy sector. Keeping dairy cows healthy is a daily task for everyone involved in primary milk production. Mastitis, or inflammation of the mammary gland, is still one of the most common health concerns and causes of economic losses for cow farmers, despite increased technology support and veterinary interventions. Making the appropriate decisions and taking the proper steps to minimise external and internal factors that raise the risk of intramammary infection are critical for high-yielding dairy cows’ mammary glands. The efficiency of commonly used antimastitis measures is limited due to the polyfactorial nature of mastitis and its reduction, thus it is vital to identify areas of risk in udder health programmes and monitoring systems. Only through adopting comprehensive udder health programmes should research efforts be made to further develop these comprehensive udder health programmes. The current study examines current understanding on damping and mastitis prevention, including SCC control, adequate feeding, housing and management, milking, and drying in dairy farming circumstances. This knowledge could aid in the improvement of mammary gland health, dairy cow welfare, and the production of safe milk for customers.

Author(s) Details

František Zigo
Department of Nutrition and Animal Husbandry, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovakia.

Silvia Ondrašovicova
Department of Biology and Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovakia.

Mária Vargová
Department of the Environment, Veterinary Legislation and Economy, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovakia.

Katarína Veselitz Lakticová
Department of the Environment, Veterinary Legislation and Economy, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovakia.

Jolanta Bujok
Department of Animal Physiology and Biostructure, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.

Ewa Pecka-Kielb
Department of Animal Physiology and Biostructure, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.

View Book:- https://stm.bookpi.org/TMGHPMDC/article/view/4366

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *