Lymphomas of the Urinary Bladder: A Review of the Literature

Lymphomas of the Urinary Bladder: A Review of the Literature

Background: Lymphoma of the urinary bladder is a very rare lesion, so some clinicians might not be familiar with its symptoms, diagnosis, or treatment.

The aim of this research was to review and update the literature on urinary bladder lymphoma.

Methods: To identify the lesion and record its appearance, diagnosis, and treatment, researchers used Internet data search engines such as Pub Med, Google, Google Scholar, Yahoo, and Bing to locate recorded literature from case reports and case series, as well as studies on lymphoma of the urinary bladder.

Results / Review of Literature: Lymphoma of the urinary bladder can be (a) primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder, which is a rare lymphoma that starts in the bladder and has no identified lymphoma anywhere, or (b) secondary lymphoma of the urinary bladder, which is much more common and is associated with a primary lymphoma that started in an extravesical location.

The majority of cases of lymphoma of the urinary bladder occur in middle-aged adults, and lymphomas of the urinary bladder have a female predominance. Secondary urinary bladder involvement occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias and lymphomas, and it is more common in advanced stage systemic lymphoma. So far, less than 100 cases of urinary bladder lymphoma have been recorded. MALT lymphoma is the most common subtype of lymphoma in the urinary bladder, affecting adults over 60 years old, with 75 percent of cases being female. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma has also been confirmed to be normal, and it is thought to be caused by MALT transformation.

Visible haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain are all symptoms of urinary bladder lymphoma.

Submucosal masses are often discovered during radiology imaging investigations of lymphoma of the urinary bladder.

Lymphomas of the urinary bladder are defined by macroscopic analysis as distinct tumours that are wide and centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder.

Positive staining of lymphomas of the urinary bladder varies depending on the subtype of lymphoma; CD20 positive lymphomas are B-cell lymphomas.

CD20 and CD19 are positively stained in MALT lymphoma, while CD5, CD10, and CD11c are negatively stained. However, FMC7 is positively stained in MALT lymphoma.

Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7 appear to stain negatively in lymphomas of the urinary bladder.

Exhibit t (11; 18) of MALT lymphoma (q21: 21).

The MALT form of lymphoma of the urinary bladder is treated with radiotherapy, which normally results in no recurrence of the tumour.

Conclusions: Urinary bladder lymphoma may be either primary or secondary lymphoma.

The diagnosis of lymphoma of the urinary bladder is dependent on the anatomy of the resected or biopsied bladder lesion, which must be confirmed by immunohistochemical examination.

Urinary bladder lymphoma is a rare condition.

Radiotherapy is an effective cure for urinary bladder lymphoma.

Author (s) Details

Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo
Department of Urology, North Manchester General Hospital, Delaunays Road, Manchester, United Kingdom.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/RTCMS-V9/article/view/523

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