Monitioring the Trends in Triglyceride (Fat) Levels of Various Stages of Pregnancy in Nigerian Women

Monitioring the Trends in Triglyceride (Fat) Levels of Various Stages of Pregnancy in Nigerian Women

Background: Poor socio-economic, early marriage, poor acceptance of contraceptives, poor spacing of pregnancies, high fertility rate and poor maternal and child health indices in developing countries such as Nigeria, leading to poor maternal-child outcome. There are physiological changes in TG metabolism during pregnancy that could be linked to increased metabolic rate. The pattern of serum lipid changes during pregnancy in women in Nigeria needs to be examined as hyperlipidemia may lead to poor maternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of one hundred and forty (140) participants between the ages of 20 and 45 with a mean sample population age of 29.74 ± 6.5 years. Group 1: The control consists of 35 (35) stable non-pregnant subjects with a mean age of 26.84 ± 5.2 Nigerian-born volunteers. Group 2: One hundred and five (105) seemingly healthy pregnant Nigerian women were included in the test, subdivided into three groups; X, Y and Z each comprised thirty-five (35) subjects divided into the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. As defined by Biosystems, the TG assay was analysed using the enzymatic spectrophotometric method. Performance: The results of the study showed a substantial rise in TG levels (p ≤ 0.05) during the first trimester of pregnancy relative to control levels as shown in Table 1. During the second trimester of pregnancy, there was a substantial rise (p ≤ 0.05) in TG levels compared with those of the control subjects. Compared with control subjects, there was a substantial rise in TG levels during the third trimester of pregnancy. Conclusion: This research showed that the most significant shift in the lipid profile during normal pregnancy was serum hypertriglyceridemia, which in the third trimester may be as high as two-three times the level in non-pregnant subjects. Since recent studies have blamed irregular lipid metabolism during pregnancy for atherosclerotic pathogenesis, cardiac ischemia, intrauterine growth disease, intrauterine growth retardation, and hypertension. This research illuminates the potential cause of developing preeclampsia and brings it to understanding. As part of regular antenatal tests, the lipid profile may be recommended and, if possible, accepted by the Clinical Services Department of this organisation. In pregnancy, this can minimise or even remove complications of hyperlipidemia.

Author(s) Details

Affi Ayuba
Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

Mutihir Josiah
Department Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

Dalili Shabbal
Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria.

Pam Stephen
Department of Radiology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

Amusa Ganiyu
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

Longwap Abdulazeez Saleh
Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

Mercy Solomon
Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

A.Lukdem
Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

T. Solewo
Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria.

View Book :- https://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/361

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