Availability and Affordability of Sanitation and Health Promoting Amenities: Driving the Impact of Knowledge of Childhood Diarrhea on Health-Seeking Practices of Under-five Children- Caregivers in Calabar-South, Calabar, Nigeria

Availability and Affordability of Sanitation and Health Promoting Amenities: Driving the Impact of Knowledge of Childhood Diarrhea on Health-Seeking Practices of Under-five Children- Caregivers in Calabar-South, Calabar, Nigeria

Context: Diarrhea takes the lives of more children than the combination of malaria, HIV and measles. Corrective steps are suggested for the prompt detection of signs of diarrhoea by caregivers and the timely initiation of oral rehydration therapy using oral rehydration solution (ORS) or sufficient home-accessible fluids. Diarrhea is the world’s second largest cause of mortality for children under five. The goal of this study was to determine the fundamental awareness of childhood diarrhoea and health-seeking practises among caregivers of children under five in Calabar-South, Calabar, Nigeria within the limits of sanitation and public health facilities available. Materials and Methods: Of the 12 wards in the study area by casting lot, six wards were selected. From each of the 6 wards, ten streets were randomly chosen. To give a total of 660 compounds, eleven compounds were picked randomly per lane. A household with a child or children under five was randomly selected per compound, and 660 caregivers were therefore enrolled for consent. To gather data from respondents, semi-structured questionnaires were used. Results: In this sample, 638 (98.2%) of respondents in children under five had excellent basic knowledge of childhood diarrhoea, 12 (1.8%) had average basic knowledge, and no category was classified as having weak basic knowledge. The incidence of childhood diarrhoea among respondents with strong diarrhoea awareness (50.3 percent) was slightly higher than among respondents with reasonable basic knowledge (50 percent ). Some caregivers preferred to pursue health treatment from conventional healers in operation during the emergence of childhood diarrhoea 6.1 percent (19), churches 1.9 percent (6), pharmacies 16.9 percent (53), patent drug stores 18.8 percent (59), hospital, 14.3 percent (45), or self-medication at home 42 percent (132). Conclusion: While most caregivers had strong basic knowledge of childhood diarrhoea, due to insufficient involvement, there were restrictions on translating this knowledge through intervention activities. The research area’s social amenity system. Provision of social services such as hospitals, pipe carried water, waste treatment facilities, power supply, water drainage etc. should be given priority by government and non-governmental authorities. These results may be due to the insufficient availability of the social facilities network comprising primary health centres and community pharmacy, pipe-borne water system, water-closet toilet system, planned water drainage system for public waste disposal dumps, etc., thus restricting the translation of awareness to activities of diarrhoea intervention.

Author (s) Details

G. I. Ogban
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria.

E. M. Ndueso
Department of Public Health, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria.

A. A. Iwuafor
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria.

U. E. Emanghe
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria.

S. N. Ushie
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.

R. I. Ejemot-Nwadiaro
Department of Public Health, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/HMMR-V3/issue/view/32

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