Background: In many Asian cultures, standing on the floor rather than sitting in a chair is preferred. Squatting and cross-legged sitting on the ground are common among the Indian population’s traditional practises and daily duties. Squatting is a closed kinetic activity that involves several joint movements.

The goal of the study was to evaluate the functional end-ranges of the hip, knee, and ankle joints in healthy Indian volunteers in common ADL situations such as squatting and cross-legged sitting.

Methods: A total of 66 healthy participants, ranging in age from 30 to 50 years, were recruited from rural and urban populations. The Universal Goniometer was used to quantify joint ROM in the lower extremities. Squat and cross-legged stances were required of all subjects, which were graded.

The individuals in cross leg sitting grade 2 (independent CLS) had hip flexion ranges of 1150, hip abduction ranges of 410, hip external rotation ranges of 420, and ankle plantar flexion ranges of 460, p0.005. Grade 2 (independent squat) had hip flexion ranges of 1130, p>0.005, knee flexion ranges of 1200, p>0.005, and ankle dorsiflexion ranges of 150, p0.005.

Conclusion: The findings imply that squatting and cross-leg sitting several times a day can help prevent the early closure of lower limb end ranges. It’s critical to understand why ranges are limited, as this has implications for clinical practise. By acknowledging such factors, future investigations may be piloted with a deeper knowledge.

Author(S) Details

Barbora Blazkova
Faculty of Health and Social Science, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

Anna Pastorkova
Faculty of Health and Social Science, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

Ivo Solansky
Faculty of Health and Social Science, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

Jr. Milos Veleminsky
Faculty of Health and Social Science, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic and Hospital Ceske Budejovice, a.s., Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

Milos Veleminsky
Faculty of Health and Social Science, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

Katerina Urbancova
Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic.

Veronika Vondraskova
Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic.

Jana Hajslova
Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic.

Jana Pulkrabova
Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic.

Radim J. Sram
Faculty of Health and Social Science, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

View Book:- https://stm.bookpi.org/RDMMR-V10/article/view/4624

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