Investigation on Tubal Infertility and Chlamydia Trachomatis in a Congolese Infertile Population

Investigation on Tubal Infertility and Chlamydia Trachomatis in a Congolese Infertile Population

Tubal-origin infertility is the most common in the sub-Saharan region. It is primarily due to infection, especially sexually transmitted infection, due to tuboperitoneal lesions. Worldwide, the major pathogen is Chlamydia trachomatis. Some studies have failed to establish the connection between tubal infertility and chlamydia trachomatis in our setting. The goal of the current study was to identify local data relating to the function of chlamydia trachomatis in tubal infertility and the usefulness of the Chlamydia trachomatis antibody titer (CAT) test in discriminating against patients with and without tuboperitoneal lesions. The mean patient age was 33.9 ± 4.8 years, the mean patient age was 19.4 ± 4.4 years and the mean number of partners was 3.1 ± 1.6. The CAT degree corresponds to the severity of the tuboperitoneum. CAT was more specific (93.3 percent; CI 95 percent: 81.7 – 98.6) than adaptive (72.7 percent; CI 95 percent: 49.8 – 89.3) and correctly discriminated against 89 percent (AUC = 0.89) of patients with or without tuboperitoneal lesions. In conclusion, Chlamydia trachomatis is the most frequent sexually transmitted pathogen associated with tubal infertility, as is reported globally. CAT, like laparoscopy, must be used as a method for choosing patients to be submitted for invasive examination. In conclusion, the most common microorganism associated with tubal infertility in the current study is Chlamydia trachomatis. With the magnitude of the tuboperitoneal lesions, the CAT level increased steadily. The CAT, with its greater precision, must also be used in our community to pick patients for more invasive examinations, such as laparoscopy.

Author(s) Details

E. Mboloko
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

M. Fataki
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

E.Nzau-Ngoma
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

L.D. Lokengo
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

A.Ingala
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

B.C. J. Bikuelo
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

A.N. Apangwa
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

M.M. M. Kapend
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

M.Mboloko
Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

N.Mumba
The Parasitology Department in the National Institute for Biomedical Research, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

View Book :- https://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/322

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