Advanced Study on Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain Relief after Maximum Static Flexibility Program

Advanced Study on Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain Relief after Maximum Static Flexibility Program

Low back pain (LBP) caused by pregnancy has an effect on the pregnancy. Pregnancy-related low back pain (LBP) affects many pregnant women’s everyday lives [1] and is characterised by lower-back pain that causes physical and emotional disabilities. Flexibilizing allows for smoother movement, which improves posture and relieves pain.

The aim of this study was to look at the effects of a maximum static flexibility programme on LBP during pregnancy.

Clinical prospective randomised controlled trial was used as the process.

Prenatal treatment provided by the Brazilian Governmental Health Program.

Participants: 40 pregnant women between the ages of 20 and 31 weeks, with or without LBP, were randomly allocated to either the experimental (EG) or control (CG) groups: EG n = 20 (E1 with LBP and E2 without LBP) and CG n = 20. (C1 with LBP and C2 without LBP).

The EG intervention consisted of static flexion sessions. CG was given standard medical attention. The pain level was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The statistical tests used were Chi-square, Wilcoxon, and Kruskal-Wallis.

Results: In terms of percent variation (%), E1 reduced LBP by 56.4 percent, while E2, C1, C2 increased LBP by 2.9 percent, 0.1 percent, and 0.5 percent, respectively. Wilcoxon test results comparing pre- and post-test pain severity levels in experimental and control groups showed substantial E1 p 0.05. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed p 0.05 when contrasting post-test C1 with E1 with E2 and C2 (C1 post vs. E1 post: p = 0.006; C1 post vs. E2 post: p 0.0001; C1 post vs. C2 post: p = 0.002), indicating that the experimental procedure had a meaningful impact.

Conclusion: Gains in LBP for EG indicate that static flexibility exercises help to avoid and minimise pregnancy-related LBP. Static exercises helped reduce or avoid LBP in pregnant women who participated in this Family Health Program. The traditional treatment for LBP in pregnancy, which consisted of drug therapy and rest, yielded no substantial results.

Author (s) Details

Helena Andrade Figueira
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Rodrigo Gomes de Souza Vale
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Wilma Ferreira Guedes Rodrigues
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Alan Andrade Figueira
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Joana Andrade Figueira
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Renata Franco Maciel
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Ryan Fernando Menezes
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Beatriz Martins Carvalho
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Christiano Lima De Lucena
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Alessandra Isabella Santiago Silva Moura
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Ana Maria Ribeiro Fonseca
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Luise Oliveira Ribeiro Da Silva
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Victoria Guerra Abdias
Laboratory of Biomedical Human Kinetics (LABIMH), Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/HMMR-V4/article/view/563

Editor 251News

leave a comment

Create Account



Log In Your Account