Plant-Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

Several microbes promote plant growth, and lots of microbial products that stimulate plant growth are marketed. during this review we restrict ourselves to bacteria that are derived from and exert this effect on the basis. Such bacteria are generally designated as PGPR (plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria). The beneficial effects of those rhizobacteria on plant growth are often direct or indirect. This review begins with describing the conditions under which bacteria sleep in the rhizosphere. To exert their beneficial effects, bacteria usually must colonize the basis surface efficiently. Therefore, bacterial traits required for root colonization are subsequently described. Finally, several mechanisms by which microbes can act beneficially on plant growth are described. [1]

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria as biofertilizers

Numerous species of soil bacteria which flourish within the rhizosphere of plants, but which can grow in, on, or around plant tissues, stimulate plant growth by a plethora of mechanisms. These bacteria are collectively referred to as PGPR (plant growth promoting rhizobacteria). The look for PGPR and investigation of their modes of action are increasing at a rapid pace as efforts are made to take advantage of them commercially as biofertilizers. After an initial clarification of the term biofertilizers and therefore the nature of associations between PGPR and plants (i.e., endophytic versus rhizospheric), this review focuses on the known, the putative, and therefore the speculative modes-of-action of PGPR. [2]

Mechanisms and applications of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria: Current perspective

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are the soil bacteria inhabiting around/on the basis surface and are directly or indirectly involved in promoting plant growth and development via production and secretion of varied regulatory chemicals within the vicinity of rhizosphere. Generally, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria facilitate the plant growth directly by either assisting in resource acquisition (nitrogen, phosphorus and essential minerals) or modulating phytohormone levels, or indirectly by decreasing the inhibitory effects of varied pathogens on plant growth and development within the sorts of biocontrol agents. Various studies have documented the increased health and productivity of various plant species by the appliance of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria under both normal and stressed conditions. [3]

A halotolerant growth promoting rhizobacteria triggers induced systemic resistance in plants and defends against fungal infection

A halotolerant rhizobacteria, Klebsiella species (referred to MBE02), was identified that had a growth stimulation effect on peanut. to realize mechanistic insights into how molecular components were reprogrammed during the interaction of MBE02 and peanut roots, we performed deep RNA-sequencing. In total, 1260 genes were differentially expressed: 979 genes were up-regulated, whereas 281 were down-regulated by MBE02 treatment as compared to uninoculated controls. an outsized component of the differentially regulated genes were associated with phytohormone signalling. [4]

Laboratory-Scale Bioremediation of Crude Oil Polluted Soil Using a Consortia of Rhizobacteria Obtained from Plants in Gokana-Ogoni, Rivers State

Background: the utilization of consortia of rhizobacterial flora in bioaugmentation of autochthonous flora can’t be over-emphasized.

Aim: This study sought to assess the potentials of rhizobacterial obtained from pre-exposed plants to petroleum pollution at Bodo creeks, Gokana-Ogoni, Nigeria.

Methods: during this 4-weeks study, polluted soil was spiked employing a soil auger while three different plants were randomly obtained from the study area and aseptically transported to the environmental microbiology laboratory, University of Port Harcourt. Baseline physicochemical and microbiological evaluation was performed on the soil samples. Biochemical and morphological features were employed within the characterization of the isolates. Bioremediation monitoring was performed on spiked soil of total petroleum hydrocarbon concentration of 17,000 mg/kg within 14 days of the study. Percentage degradation of the petroleum was evaluated. [5]

Reference

[1] Lugtenberg, B. and Kamilova, F., 2009. Plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria. Annual review of microbiology, 63, (Web Link)

[2] Vessey, J.K., 2003. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria as biofertilizers. Plant and soil, 255(2), (Web Link)

[3] Ahemad, M. and Kibret, M., 2014. Mechanisms and applications of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria: current perspective. Journal of King saud University-science, 26(1), (Web Link)

[4] A halotolerant growth promoting rhizobacteria triggers induced systemic resistance in plants and defends against fungal infection
Sandeep Sharma, Chen Chen, Sudhir Navathe, Ramesh Chand & Shree P. Pandey
Scientific Reports volume 9, (Web Link)

[5] Emmanuel, O., Enobong, E. and Gideon, A. (2018) “Laboratory-Scale Bioremediation of Crude Oil Polluted Soil Using a Consortia of Rhizobacteria Obtained from Plants in Gokana-Ogoni, Rivers State”, Journal of Advances in Microbiology, 9(1), (Web Link)

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